IRA plot against Prince Philip
Written by ACM   
Sunday, 09 March 2014
An IRA plot to murder Prince Philip in Sydney has been revealed by a former military intelligence officer and news reporter, Warner Russell.
 
This was in 1973, at the height of the Irish Republican Army bombing campaign in Britain, reports Warren Gibbs in The Sunday Telegraph 9 March 2014.

  IRA terrorists subsequently murdered two young Australians in the Netherlands.   In 1999, the IRA leader came to Australia to campaign for a Yes vote in the republican campaign. (The ARM ignored ACM's call to distance themselves from him)

In 1979 Prince Philip's uncle,  Lord Mountbatten, along with three other people, including a grandson Nicholas, was assassinated by the IRA, who planted a bomb in his fishing boat

 
 
 
Photo: An IRA plot to murder Prince Philip in Sydney has been revealed by a former military intelligence officer and news reporter, Warner Russell.  This was in 1973, at the height of the Irish Republican Army bombing campaign in Britain, reports Warren Gibbs in The Sunday Telegraph 9 March 2014.  IRA terrorists subsequently murdered two young Australians in the Netherlands.   In 1999, the IRA leader came to Australia to campaign for a Yes vote in the republican campaign. (The ARM ignored ACM's call to distance themselves from him) A report about two bombs, as well as two decoy bombs, being detected appeared in The New York Times on 16 March 1973. Local reporting in Australia was suppressed under a security "D" notice .   Twenty four  hours before the discovery of the bombs, Mr. Russell  had received an anonymous phone death threat against the Prince while he was working on the news desk. A caller with a “guttural voice” told him: “We are going to get that Greek bastard, the Duke. He is a dead man.” Mr Russell said: “I immediately informed the Special Branch as well as my own intelligence contact Lt Colonel Tim Swift at Victoria Barracks in Paddington. “I was told the threat was credible and of the likely involvement of the IRA.”  [The image is from the 1954 Tour when the Queen and Prince Philip arrived at Government House  Brisbane]
 
A report about two bombs, as well as two decoy bombs, being detected appeared in The New York Times on 16 March 1973. Local reporting in Australia was suppressed under a security "D" notice . 

 Twenty four hours before the discovery of the bombs, Mr. Russell had received an anonymous phone death threat against the Prince while he was working on the news desk.

 A caller with a “guttural voice” told him: “We are going to get that Greek bastard, the Duke. He is a dead man.”

Mr Russell said: “I immediately informed the Special Branch as well as my own intelligence contact Lt Colonel Tim Swift at Victoria Barracks in Paddington. I was told the threat was credible and of the likely involvement of the IRA.”
 

                   [The image is from the 1954 Tour when the Queen and Prince Philip arrived at Government House Brisbane]