Republican flag changers: Just tell the truth
Written by Professor David Flint and Luke Hantzis   
Sunday, 24 February 2013

A frequent myth perpetrated by republicans is that the national competition for our national flag required that the Union Jack be part of the design.

Their massive 2010 offensive culminated in a 60 Minutes programme. This was  broadcast nationally over the Channel 9 network - and with remarkable arrogance - on ANZAC Eve 2010. 

Leading republican Ray Martin repeated this myth, but was caught out - and not only on this, as our report "Official:Republicans misled TV viewers over Flag" reveals.


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[Sir Edmund Barton ]


Mr. Allan Pigeon,President of the Queensland Branch of the Australian National Flag Association filed  a meticulously argued complaint  with the television regulator, the Australian Communications and Media Authority. They upheld the complaint and found the programme had misled the public.

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[ Sir Edmund Barton, daughter Stephanie, and Lady Barton - Source Daily Telegraph ]

 

..official rules... 

 

 

The rules for the competition follow:

 

Commonwealth of Australia Gazette Number 27 (1901) 

Commonwealth of Australia

Prime Minister's Office

29th April, 1901

Design for a Federal Flag

 

The Government of the Commonwealth of Australia invite competitive designs for a Federal Flag, such designs to be forwarded by post or otherwise not later than the 31st May, 1901.  

The designs will be judged by a Board to be appointed by the Federal Government for the purpose, and a sum of £75 will be paid to the designer of that selected as the best.  

Each competitor will be required to forward two coloured sketches--one for the merchant service, and one for naval or official use--not less than 6 inches by 3 inches in size.  

All designs must be indorsed on the cover "Commonwealth Flag," and must be addressed to "The Secretary to the Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of Australia, Melbourne."  

Each design must bear a motto or nom de plume, and must be accompanied by a sealed envelope bearing on its face the motto or nom de plume with which the designer signed, and enclosing the name and address of the designer.  

The successful design will be submitted to the Imperial authorities.  

The award of the Board, however, will be final, and the prize will be given in accordance with their decision, even if the design be not accepted by the Imperial authorities.

Edmund Barton