Republican dreams fade
Written by Professor David Flint AM   
Tuesday, 22 March 2011
 Aboriginal elder Esther Kirby from Kerang Victoria says she would like to see a king of Australia once again. "I think it's fantastic," she told The Australian’s Stuart Rintoul  as she waited for the prince to arrive.

"He's his mother's son, I think -- a new generation."


Would she like to see a republic?

 "No, I think we should have a king," she said. But young King William, not old King Charles, "because he's young and cute".


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...rekindling a love of Kings...




In “Republican dreams fade in prince's face” (22/3)  Stuart Rintoul conclusion is about the visit is this:

 It is a measure of how far republican dreams have retreated in Australia that a prince with a boyish face and a nice way about him can rekindle a love of kings.

He tells how Jan Jewsin was early into the street in Kerang, in place a good two hours before he arrived, a photograph of a young princess Diana printed on her handbag.

"I've had the handbag for many, many years," she said.

"I had it up on my wardrobe and I thought today I'd bring it out because the prince reminds me very much of his mother.

"She said she had come to see the prince, "because we appreciate what he's doing for our country people, to come and see us in bad times.

"I'd love to see him the next king. I'd like to see a king of Australia. I'm the old-fashioned type."




...and the young?...

  In the main street of an Australian country town, schoolgirls sit on the shoulders of their boyfriends and wave signs that say "Will you marry me" and children raise photographs of Charles's and Diana's wedding.

The prince passes by, shaking hands and smiling warmly and says, "You're making me blush".