The least corrupt, too
Written by Professor David Flint AM   
Sunday, 31 October 2010

It seems that however you measure them, and however you weigh them, constitutional monarchies - crowned republics- outperform every other constitutional model.

We have been pointing this out since the inception of this column, indeed since the campaign in the nineties.

When I was invited to a debate on this at an inner city branch of a major party, and I stated this proposition,the republicans did not wait for the evidence.  Instead was greeted with derision, with very loud guffaws.

I then began to produce the evidence. This was received in silence. I don’t think it changed the minds of those who had already decided that the Crown had to go, hoever divisive this was and whatever the cost.



...Sir Robert...




During the referendum campaign, one prominent politician, Senator Amanda Vanstone,  even argued that Sir Robert Gordon Menzies would have come out as a republican.

ImageI have no doubt that Sir Robert remains a monarchist.  And as a good Presbyterian, he would  not break the Third Commandment.ed and remains



...least corrupt...




As we reported here in 2008, “Why are crowned republics so much better? the respected anti-corruption organisation, Transparency International, publishes a corruption perceptions index. The 2010 index ha sbeen released.

Although constitutional monarchies make up only 15% of the world’s nations, 70% of  the 10 least corrupt countries in this are constitutional monarchies. 

Crowned republics are overrepresented by a factor of 4.6

And of the top 20, 11 are constitutional monarchies.




...Her Majesty...



 

Moreover those countries which have the good fortune to have Queen Elizabeth II as sovereign make up less than 8% of the countries of the world. 

Sp there should only be one or two in the top twenty.

There are five.

The Queen's Realms are over represented by a factor of 3.125.



...support for politicans' republic crumbling...



So why do the elites want Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United Kingdom and Barbados to change their constitutions and become politicians’ republics? 

It is not to improve the system of government. Not at all.

It is simply  to increase the power of the political class. Their class.

That is why support for a politicians' republic is crumbling. Everywhere.


Image