Serbia and the Senate
Written by Professor David Flint AM   
Monday, 19 November 2007

Dear Supporter,

 

ACM takes no position on world affairs, or on other people's constitutions. However, the situation in many other countries does provide lessons for us. It is interesting then to consider what is happening in Serbia. It will be recalled that the NATO powers had decided to intervene in Serbia for humanitarian reasons. This was done without a Security Council resolution - the general view was that the risk of a veto was too high. Mr George Bougias, who spoke on the intemationalisation of the Crown at our ACM National Conference, has passed on to me some information that I am sure readers will find interesting. The republican constitution obviously does not have widespread support. They cannot elect a new president - apparently the people are so disinterested, they refuse to vote in sufficient numbers. So far there have been three attempts to elect the president! Speaking on the Voice of America, the editor of Defence and Foreign Affairs - Strategic Policy, Mr Gregory Copley suggest one solution to the continuing political crisis - the restoration of the monarchy, which the communists had removed. "As one of the solutions to the political crisis, Serbian Orthodox Church and Crown Prince Alexander II Karadjordjevic have initiated the issue of reestablishment of the constitutional parliamentary monarchy in Serbia" — said Copley. "This is very important, for it could provide continuity of the state, like in many countries in the world, such as Australia, Malaysia, Canada etc, since the constitutional parliamentary monarchy would protect the state structure and the constitution through its mediating and symbolic role, while the parties would go on with their normal political activities" — believes Mr. Copley. "The reestablishment of monarchy in Serbia would not influence the present State Union of Serbia and Montenegro. Each of them would have their own political structure, and on the level of the State Union, there would be a president, or another form of a joint ruling body, independent from the monarchy. Both members of  the State Union would be able to function according to their traditional structures and within the accepted federal form, although one of them would be a monarchy and the other a republic" - concluded Mr. Copley. The full press release may be found at http ://www.royaffamily.org/press/press-det/stampa-718.htm and other ones at http://www.royalfamily.org/index_eng.html

 

What is particularly interesting for Australians is the growing international recognition of the soundness and stability of the Australian system. The success of the restoration in Spain and the possibility of a restoration in other troubled states is testimony to the strength of this model. Incidentally, I have been asked what is ACM's position on the proposal to change the constitution to make it easier to resolve deadlocks between the House and the Senate. This is obviously important, and many of us are reluctant to contemplate such a change. But it does not go to ACM's mission-to preserve, to protect and to defend the Constitution of The Commonwealth, the role of the Crown in it, our Flag and our heritage. So ACM has no formal position on the proposal - this is a matter which can and ought to be debated. But it will not be, and should not be passed, unless and until the Australian people are persuaded, in the words of one of our great Founding Fathers, that the proposed change is desirable, irresistible and inevitable! Whatever our views, it is obvious that this threshold has not been reached. In the meantime, all of us at Australians for Constitutional Monarchy wish each and everyone of you, constitutional monarchists and republicans, your families and those close to you, a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year - and don't forget to hear and see Her Majesty's Christmas message.