Australian Republic Constitution
Australian Flag News Get Involved! Events Resources
Main Menu
ACM Home
About ACM
ACM News
Anthems
Afghan Court Martial
Book Reviews
The Commonwealth
Contact ACM
Convenor's Column
Constitutional Monarchies and Republics Compared
Constitutional Monarchy in the Muslim World
Cost of Republicanism to the Taxpayer
Crowned Republic
Diamond Jubilee 2012
Event News
Federalism and the Mining Tax
Fiji
Flag: Keep The Flag
Governor of New South Wales
Head of State
Keating-Turnbull Republic: The Nineties
Knights & Dames
Latest News and Opinions
Links
Mate for a Head of State
Media and monarchy
Nile Inquiry
Opinion Polling
Orthodoxy and Monarchy
People's Republic?
Plebiscites
Prince Andrew
Prince Charles
Prince Harry
Prince Philip
Prince William & Catherine
Prince William In Australia
Prince William: The Early Years
Racist Republic?
Reserve Powers of the Crown
Resources
Return the Governor
Royal Commissions
Royal Finances
Self Funded Monarchy
Royal Yacht Britannia
The Succession
2020 Summit
Join our Mailing List
See our selection of videos from across the world:-
ACM Videos
AussieCrownTV - ACM's own TV channel:
Aussie Crown TV
Follow ACM on Facebook:
Facebook
Self Funded Monarchy
Self Funded Monarchy
Royal Finances
Royal Finances
Diamond Jubilee 2012
Diamond Jubilee 2012
Head of State
Prince Philip
Prince Philip
Special Caribbean Report: Crown & Commonwealth

      Crown

The Commonwealth
The Commonwealth
Prince Harry
Prince Harry
Prince Andrew
Prince Andrew
Knights & Dames
Knights & Dames
The King's Speech: read the book, see the film.

The King's Speech

Watch the 2010 Neville Bonner Oration: Tony Abbott.
Tony Abbott
Nile Inquiry
Royal Commissions
Royal Commissions
Opinion Polls

 

Plebiscites
Plebiscites
2020 Summit
2020 Summit
Orthodoxy & Monarchy
Orthodoxy & Monarchy
Afghan Court Martial
Constitutional Monarchy in the Muslim World
Constitutional Monarchy in the Muslim World
Mate for a Head of State
Mate for a Head of State
Racist Republic?
Racist Republic
A People's Republic?
A People's republic?
Keating Turnbull Republic: The Nineties
The Keating Turnbull Republic
Crowned Republic
Crowned Republic
Polls
Republicans' Best Asset?
Is David Flint ( National Convenor since 1998) the republicans best asset, as some claim?
ACM Home arrow Constitutional Monarchy in the Muslim World

Constitutional Monarchy in the Muslim World
Constitutional Monarchy in the Muslim World

Of the seven oldest continuing democracies in the world, five are constitutional monarchies, four of which have Queen Elizabeth II as their sovereign.

This is testimony to the fact that constitutional monarchy under the Westminster system is the only constitutional model which has been imported by other countries and which has operated successfully for any extended period of time.

This is not limited to the Christian world, Catholic, Orthodox, Anglican, and Reformed. Constitutional Monarchy has worked very well in Arab and other Muslim countries.



...more freedom, peaceful transitions of power....




In these countries there has been more freedom of speech, with governments changing in elections or on the floor of parliament. Minorities have been better protected. The Copts in Egypt are a case in point. They were best protected under the British occupation and then the constitutional monarchy.  It was only after the installation of a republic that the persecution recommences, along with restricted rights and a dictatorship.

It would be unrealistic to expect that a monarchy in a developing country be as little involved in the direction of the government as in say, Canada.  But even where the monarch  actually governed as in say Iran, few would doubt that the position then was vastly superior to what is happening now.

A marvellous feature of monarchy is how it evolves, and evolves in a democratic direction, as we see today in Morocco.

Had the Shah survived  (and the French and American governments of the day must bear a great part of the blame), it is likely that under his son Iran would today be a happier, freer and less threatening power.

  

Egyptian Copts abandoned by Canberra Print E-mail
Written by Professor David Flint AM   
Monday, 07 February 2011

Prime Minister Julia Gillard’s call for change in the government of Egypt recalls a provincial Irish newspaper’s 1897 editorial, “We have previously warned the Tsar”.

The Kremlin must have trembled when they read the final sentence: “'The Skibbereen Eagle has its eye on the Tzar of Russia.”

The Egyptians are unlikely to take notice of the great powers, much less the Australian government.

 The Americans have been giving conflicting advice, with the views of their special representative being dismissed by the administration as ”personal views”. Until now the great powers were strongly supportive of the Mubarek regime.



...once a liberal, tolerant and  cosmopolitan society...


 

In any event, the Egyptians can thank the Americans, the Russians and the Muslim Brotherhood for supporting the army’s ending of Egypt as a liberal tolerant and cosmopolitan society.

Such a society is rare in the Arab world. Indeed few countries experience the quiet and peaceful transfer of power we saw in Australia in 2007. Even in some European countries, this can be accompanied by noisy and often violent and lengthy demonstrations.

.



...matter of real concern for Australia ....




Apart from gratuitous and unwelcome advice, the real issues for the Australian government are two. First, looking after the interests of Australian citizens in Egypt.

Second, there is one matter where the Australian Prime Minister could perform a real service relating to one of the core functions of the federal government, immigration. 

She could correct the inexplicable decision taken by the Rudd government to abandon that persecuted minority, the Copts, who have strong links to Australia through the local Coptic community here.

Image



....Copts....





As we noted here (17/1), the Copts are original inhabitants of Egypt. Since the  Arab – Muslim invasion of the seventh century they have known discrimination and persecution, except for one period.

 

This began with the rise of the Muhammad Ali Dynasty, and firmed under the nineteenth century British occupation which was formalised in the First World War.

 

After the war the British offered Egypt independence provided they retained control over the Suez Canal.  When this proved unacceptable to the Egyptian leaders, the British ended the protectorate and declared Egyptian independence, while retaining the Canal Zone.

 Egypt adopted a constitution based indirectly on Britain’s, but in which The King took a more active role. Under this Egypt was a robust cosmopolitan parliamentary democracy.

The period from the later part of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth – the period relating to the emergence of the Egyptian constitutional monarchy - is today known as a golden age among the Copts.

Image



...coup...




The 1952 coup d'état in 1952 against King Farouk by General Naquib and Colonel Gamal Abdel Nasser, supported by the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood, the Russian KGB and foolishly, the American CIA and the US administration.

President Eisenhower was later to regret this and his action against the Anglo-French intervention during the Suez Crisis.

The end of the constitutional monarchy signalled the end of liberal, cosmopolitan Egypt, as it has in other countries.

The republicans expelled the Jewish, Greek and other European communities and seized their real property without compensation. The assets of companies with any European, Jewish, or Christian involvement were also seized, again without compensation. Copts were deemed to be second class Egyptians. Egypt became a one party state.


Image
[King and Queen of Egypt with the Shah and Queen of Iran ]



...demonstration in Sydney...

 


A demonstration about their current plight was held by the Copts and their friends in Sydney on 19 January, but most Australians would not have known.

Unlike some smaller demonstrations, this went mainly unreported.   Some demonstrations even receive advance notice in sections of the media.

Paul Sheehan piece  in The Sydney Morning Herald on 24 January was an exception. Writing that Martin Place is  the symbolic centre, the point zero, of Australia's existence as a sophisticated economy, he said:-

“But last Wednesday it looked medieval. A forest of crucifixes sprouted among a sea of earnest faces that would look comfortable on ancient coins. The talk was of murder and persecution. The threat was real. Hyperbole was unnecessary.”

“Most at the rally were Coptic Orthodox Christians, the Egyptian branch of Christianity. They increasingly find common purpose with the expatriate communities of Assyrian Christians from Iraq and Maronite Christians from Lebanon. All three groups, who collectively number about 200,000, are heavily represented in western Sydney. All three are feeling the pressure of the religious cleansing of Christians in the Middle East.”




...immigrants and politics...





 

 [ Continued below ] 
Read more...
 
Tunis to Cairo Print E-mail
Written by Professor David Flint AM   
Saturday, 05 February 2011

The French secret service confirmed that the wife of Tunisian President Ben-Ali, Ms Trabelsi, went to the Bank of Tunisia with her staff in January and demanded that the 1.5 tonnes of gold bullion valued at about US $60 million be handed over to her for safekeeping.

When the bank president refused, a telephone call was said to have come from the President ordering that the handover take place. These reports have since been denied by the central bank.

A few hours later the President and the First Lady flew out of the country planning to seek refuge in France. However, they were diverted to Saudi Arabia after President Nicolas Sarkozy, hitherto a supporter, refused them permission to land.




..disaster: constitutional monarchy to republic...



Image
[ Muhammad VIII al-Amin, King of Tunisia ]


It is a too familiar story. 

An Arab constitutional monarchy in which there is at least some degree of political freedom and where minorities are well protected is overthrown. A republic is declared which is soon exposed as a dictatorship in which the ruling family enrich themselves, often proposing dynastic control.

Ousting the monarchy  has invariably been a disaster.  

Tunisia is a good example. President Ben-Ali  held the office from 7 November, 1987, until he was forced to step down and flee the country on 14 January, 2011. Appointed Prime Minister in October 1987, he had seized the presidency in November 1987 in a bloodless coup d'état from then President for life  Habib Bourguiba.

Bourguiba had overthrown the constitutional monarch, King Muhammad VIII al-Amin in 1957. President Ben Ali was subsequently re-elected with enormous majorities at every election, the last on 25 October, 2009. 

[ We saw a similarly ludicrous  majority in favour of a republic in Australia at that disgrace, the 2020 Summit.  It served as a warning that our republican politicians are quite prepared to resort to the tools of a tinpot dictatorship.

Christopher Hitchens recently advised Arab dictators ( National Post 2/2) never to claim more than say 75% in any popular vote.] 

On 26 January 2011, the Tunisian government issued an international arrest warrant for the arrest of Ben-Ali. It accused him of taking money out of the nation illegally and other offences.

The Swiss government then froze millions of dollars held in bank accounts by his family.

On 28 January 2011, Interpol issued an arrest warrant for Ben Ali and his six family members, including his wife Leila Trabelsi.

The events in Tunisia are generally believed to have triggered the unrest which is sweeping the Arab world, especially in Egypt.

.



...hereditary absolutist republics...





It was widely believed that the President planned that his wife should succeed him on his death.

Keeping it within the family is not at all unusual. Syria is a recent example.

In Egypt the only period of democratic government was under the constitutional monarchy which was overthrown in after the  1952 coup d'état against King Farouk by General Naquib and Colonel Gamal Abdel Nasser.(“The Copts and the monarchy,” 17 January, 2011)

The Egyptian constitutional monarchy was one of the benefits bequeathed to Egypt by the British. The coup was supported by the Muslim Brotherhood, the Russians, the CIA and the American administration.

Image
[ King Farouk, Queen Farida and Princess Ferial ]



 

[Continued below] 
 

Read more...
 
Lost Voices of Afghanistan. Print E-mail
Written by ACM   
Saturday, 22 January 2011

An Afghan woman and boy. Getty

Apart from the beauty of much of the content, two things struck me about this BBC programme about war poetry by civilians in Afghanisatan.

One was that at least one is critical of British troops there, his voice being protected by those same British troops.

The other was the recollection of the constitutional monarchy under King Mohammed Zahir Shah as a golden age. The King  was overthrown in a coup which led to the Soviet invasion and a series of increasingly extremist regimes.

With the current Western military intervention, the American government made a serious error in their  ideological decision to eliminate the Afghan monarchy from any role in the new Afghan Constitution.

As we mentioned here, two thirds of the delegates to the loya jirga in 2002 had signed a petition to make  King Zahir Shah the interim head of state.

As an opinion piece in a prominent US newspaper  pointed out, only  “massive US interference behind the scenes in the form of bribes, secret deals, and arm twisting got the US-backed candidate for the job, Hamid Karzai, installed instead.”

Image



...the programme: Lost Voices of Afghanistan ...


  

When the BBC's War correspondent Jonathan Charles made an appeal for Afghan civilians to send in their war poetry, little did he anticipate the flood of writing it would inspire.

Here, he explores a selection of those poems and interviews the authors.

The writers have many stories to tell which have inspired haunting poetry. Verse has, for some, become the best way of expressing not only the sights and sounds of the war, but the emotions.

This is poetry of witness, of anger, propaganda, and it's a catharsis.

While Jonathan was interviewing one poet, the writer suddenly revealed that he had been the finance minister of Afghanistan in the 1970s and later lived under house arrest. He has turned away from politics and is now writing poetry.

Most shockingly of all, Jonathan talks to a woman now in exile in Canada who witnessed a couple trying to sell two of their children to feed the rest of their family. Her powerful poem The Queen of the World sees her imagining having the power to stop such awful events.

With the back-drop of a great poetry tradition in the area, there is an explosion of new poetry in Afghanistan.

In each state, we hear that poetry reading evenings are flourishing.

There is even a story of British troops transporting people to these events and guarding them, while inside the poets recite angry verse about the visiting soldiers.


[ To hear the programme  while it is available on the BBC World Service , click on the image at the top of the page]

 

 
Kingdom of Morocco: the success story of the Arab world Print E-mail
Written by Professor David Flint AM   
Wednesday, 12 January 2011

For the better part of a decade this column has been arguing that the Kingdom of Morocco is one of the Arab world’s most liberal and successful states.

Indeed in a piece in the Australian Financial Review on 2 December 2003, I drew on the Moroccan example to say the Iraqis could do worse than return to being a constitutional monarchy, as they were in happier days.  

Image
[ The Kingdom of Morocco ]





...monarchy gives Morocco stability....




Now the distinguished commentator on international affairs, Greg Sheridan has declared that the Kingdom of  Morocco is a success story in the Arab world.

In an outstanding piece in The Australian (8/1) , “Optimistic Morocco reaches out to the west,” Mr. Sheridan says that:

“...you get the feeling that if Morocco doesn't succeed, nowhere in the Arab world will. Its monarchy gives it stability.”

Image





...King has enormous authority....





“With 35 million people, Morocco is the fourth-largest Arab nation, after Egypt, Sudan and Algeria. It has free elections and two houses of parliament.

“The King, Mohammed VI, whose portrait adorns every official building and many public places, retains, however, immense authority and executive power. Morocco's critics accuse it of arbitrary arrest and some censorship.

Image
[ HM King Mohammed V ]

 

“Nonetheless, Morocco has a better claim to democratic practice than any of its neighbours in North Africa.

“ For all its social inequalities it has a history of political pluralism. It has a long culture to draw on and is a close friend of all the Western powers. Somehow, if moderation, tolerance and economic development don't work here, you wonder whether they will work anywhere in the Arab world.



..support for Australia...


Mohammed Cheikh Biadillah, the distinguished looking president of the House of Councillors, the Moroccan equivalent of the Senate, welcomed me and a small group of Australians into a lavish meeting room in the parliamentary building in Rabat.“Like every official I met in Morocco, he was very positive about Australia, but his opening remark contained a barb: "We are very happy to have an embassy in Canberra, and not to be represented from Jakarta, or from Paris.

" This was an obvious reference to Moroccan annoyance that Australia, which is always willing to lecture the Middle East about its failings, is happy to spend many tens of millions of dollars of aid there and even more in military deployments, yet has no embassy in Morocco, nor indeed in most of North Africa. Morocco is nonetheless supporting Australia's bid for a temporary seat on the UN Security Council.”




...
constitutional monarchy again perform well...





This level of support for Australia is rare in the Arab world.
It is clear that constitutional monarchies are more likely to perform well in terms of health wealth and wealth than other systems of government.


  

[Continues below ]

Read more...
 
Iran: Tragic Death of Shah's Younger Son Print E-mail
Written by Professor David Flint AM   
Friday, 07 January 2011

This news from the website of HIH Crown Prince Reza Pahlavi of Iran shocked Monarchists worldwide, observed  Harold Schmauze of the Monarchist Alliance: 

 

Statement of Reza Pahlavi II of Iran concerning the passing away of Prince Alireza Pahlavi

Image
[Prince Alireza Pahlavi 1966 - 2011 ]

Wednesday, January 5th, 2011

Boston, Massachusetts

 Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

Thank you for your attendance.

 

I wish to extend my family’s deep gratitude for the outpour of love and support from so many Iranians, from Iran, our beloved homeland, as well as those around the world; and people of different nationalities whose sympathies and support continues to strengthen our family, knowing that we are not alone as we grieve the tragic passing of my beloved brother, Alireza.  Our gratitude also goes to the loving support from this great city of Boston, which served as home to my brother for the past several years.

 

Depression is an illness, often with tragic consequences; it has unfortunately a universal imprint affecting families around the world without regard to nationality, geography, age, gender or social and economic situation.  My family has had its share of dealing with this debilitating illness, but we also realize it is not a tragedy isolated to us; we share this with the millions around the world, particularly those in our homeland Iran suffering from the same. 

 

We mourn today, the succumbing of our beloved Alireza to the weight, pain and daily burdens of this grave illness, and because of its robbing the promise of yet another life, unfulfilled.   Alireza will be remembered for many things, foremost among them, his serious passion for the history of the Iranian civilization.  He was an accomplished scholar in the field having come here to Boston (Harvard) to complete his studies and research, extending his expertise which began in Princeton and then Columbia. 

 

For those of you who have asked, my Brother left behind his final wishes, including his request for cremation and the remains released into the Caspian Sea, which we shall dutifully fulfill. 

 

We are still finalizing our plans and arrangements in terms of a memorial service which will be shared with our friends around the world in due time.

 

At this time I would appreciate the media’s honoring my family’s need to privately mourn this tragedy.

 

Thank you.

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next > End >>

Results 28 - 36 of 42
ROYAL VISIT 2014

Image

The Book Depository
Image
Image
Prince William: The Early Years
Prince Charles

Prince Charles

Constitutional Monarchies & Republics Compared

Image


Defend the Constitution and Flag
Australian Election Watch

10th Anniversary Neville Bonner Oration

11th Anniversary and Appeal

Crowned Republic 

   Keep The Australian Flag
Return the Governor to Government House
The Succession
The Succession
The Governor of New South Wales
Governor of New South Wales
Fiji
Fijian soldier
Media and Monarchy
Media and Monarchy
Royal Yacht Britannia
Royal Yacht Britannia
Republic Audit: Costs of Republic
Republic Audit: Costs of Republic
Reserve Powers of the Crown
Events
September 2017 October 2017 November 2017
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
Week 40 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Week 41 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
Week 42 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
Week 43 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
Week 44 29 30 31